Press Release

Kuster Highlights Breast Cancer Detection Bill during Visit to Gamma …

Kuster has cosponsored Breast Density and Mammography Report Act to promote better breast cancer detection, prevention Studies show women with dense breast tissue four times more likely to develop breast cancer SALEM, NH (January 28, 2014) – As part of her commitment to helping improve women’s health care services, Congresswoman Annie Kuster (NH-02) met on January 21 with executives from Gamma Medica, where she discussed the Breast Density and Mammography Reporting Act. Kuster recently cosponsored the bill in an effort to promote better breast cancer detection and prevention, and to help provide women with the tools to make informed health decisions. “Thousands of women in New Hampshire and across the country are being diagnosed with breast cancer each year. It’s absolutely essential they have every tool available to battle this terrible disease,” Kuster said. “That’s what the Breast Density and Mammography Reporting Act is all about. It will help to make sure women, especially those at greater risk for breast cancer, can detect it early and return to good health.” First introduced by Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro, the bill ensures that relative breast density is included in the information provided to women and health care providers following a mammogram. Studies have shown that women with dense breast tissue are at least four times more likely to develop breast cancer, and they are also more likely to have an inaccurate mammogram reading. Gamma Medica, which relocated last year from California to Salem, develops, markets, and services innovative molecular breast imaging systems to help radiologists detect early stage cancers. The company utilizes Molecular Breast Imaging, a highly effective secondary diagnostic tool that enables and improves assessments, especially for women with dense breast tissue. In 2013, an estimated 1,180 Granite State women were projected to be newly diagnosed with breast cancer, according to the New Hampshire Breast Cancer Coalition, and an estimated 170 were projected to die of the disease. “The Breast Density and Mammography Reporting Act represents an important development in the battle against breast cancer,” said Jim Calandra, Gamma Medica’s Chief Executive Officer. “We feel that women should understand the true nature of breast cancer risk. With this bill, cosponsored by Congresswoman Kuster, women with dense breast tissue will have the information needed to assess this highly prevalent risk factor.” Earlier this year, Kuster called on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to cover certain medications that help prevent breast cancer under the Affordable Care Act. The request was granted last week when HHS issued a ruling that women who are at a higher risk for breast cancer will have access to certain categories of preventative drugs without any out-of-pocket costs. About Gamma Medica, Inc. Gamma Medica, Inc. is dedicated to the development of advanced digital imaging technologies that address the growing importance of overcoming the critical shortcomings of mammography and other screening modalities in the early detection of breast cancer. The company designs, builds and services the LumaGEM® MBI system, the first commercially available, FDA-cleared planar, dual head, fully solid-state digital imaging system utilizing cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) technology for molecular breast ... Read more

Radiation Beams Photographed in the Human Body through …

January 27, 2014 - A scientific breakthrough may give the field of radiation oncology new tools to increase the precision and safety of radiation treatment in cancer patients by helping doctors "see" the powerful beams of a linear ... Read more

Breast Cancer in Young Women after Treatment for …

UK, January 27, 2014 - Girls treated for Hodgkin's disease during adolescence acquire a considerable risk of developing breast cancer, as shown by an observational study published in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International. The study, which was carried out by Günther Schellong and his colleagues in the German Working Group on the Long-Term Sequelae of Hodgkin's Disease, has an unusually long follow-up time (average 17.8 years, maximum 33 years). The incidence figures for secondary breast cancer are based on long-term observation of 590 female patients in the German-Austrian pediatric treatment trials dating back to the years 1978 to 1995. The authors estimate that 19% of the girls treated with radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease develop secondary breast cancer within 30 years as a result of that therapy. Because of these findings, a structured screening program for breast cancer in this high-risk group has been set up in Germany, making use of existing structures put in place by the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (Deutsches Konsortium für familiären Brust- und Eierstockkrebs). The study authors recommend that, when supradiaphragmatic radiotherapy is necessary in girls over the age of 9, the part(s) of the chest exposed to the radiation should be kept as small as medically justifiable. This will allow the risk of breast cancer to be kept as low as ... Read more

Spire Fylde Coast Hospital Bolsters General Ultrasound …

SIEMENS, UK, January 23, 2014 - Spire Fylde Coast Hospital, part of the Spire Healthcare Group, is benefitting from the installation of an ACUSON S2000™ diagnostic ultrasound system from Siemens Healthcare. The system was chosen for its excellent image quality which is aiding diagnosis and providing staff with the ability to see fine detail on images. The ACUSON S2000, which replaces a previous-generation Siemens system, was smoothly installed and handles a mixed workload including abdominal, breast, neurology, vascular and musculoskeletal imaging. The system’s high-definition imaging functionality will also enable urologists working at the hospital to conduct transrectal ultrasound on the prostate, a service that was previously unavailable to patients. The team have found the interface and syngo® platform easy to operate, particularly when conducting musculoskeletal procedures. The ACUSON S2000 features high-density element array transducers and delivers clear image resolution, allowing researchers to distinguish fine tissue detail. The system is ergonomically designed for maximum user comfort and flexibility - whether seated or standing, the natural and extended reach zones are designed for ease-of- use, with the frequently used controls conveniently located. This is further boosted by eSieScan™ workflow protocols to streamline clinical workflow. “We have been greatly impressed with the image quality of the ACUSON S2000 and the flexibility provided by both the HD transducer and the smaller transducer for musculoskeletal work,” states Sue Woodhouse, Diagnostic Imaging Manager at Spire Fylde Coast Hospital. “All of our radiologists have commented on the detail of the imaging, that offers a great level of quality for enhanced diagnosis. We are pleased to continue to work with Siemens, who we have enjoyed a good working relationship with for a number of years.” “We are delighted that Spire Fylde Coast Hospital will be able to expand its remit to patients as a result of the installation of an ACUSON S2000 ultrasound system,” states Richard Evans, Regional Sales Manager at Siemens Healthcare. “We look forward to maintaining the excellent relationship we share with the hospital as we continue to support its delivery of high-quality patient ... Read more

Prostate Cancer Vaccines Receive a Boost in Funding…

USA, January 22, 2014 - The development of two new vaccines that are hoped to offer an alternative to castration therapy for men with recurring prostate cancer, is due for an $8 million boost in funding. The pharmaceutical company Madison Vaccines Incorporated (MVI) recently announced the success of a finance round led by Venture Investors, LLC, that has secured the funds to expand a Phase II trial of the MVI-816 vaccine that was otherwise in danger of being “too small to be convincing," explains MVI’s scientific co-founder, Douglas McNeel. In addition, the funding will enable safety studies of another of the company’s DNA vaccines (MVI-118) to go ahead. The MVI-816 vaccine is designed to treat prostate cancer patients who have undergone initial surgery or radiotherapy but have found that their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, a biomarker for prostate cancer, is on the rise again after treatment. Men who have rising PSA levels despite having undergone these initial therapies are at a particularly high risk of the cancer spreading beyond the prostate to other areas of the body. Currently, their only choice is to “wait and see” whether their PSA continues to rise or to undergo a form of castration, either surgical or chemical. This castration, also known of as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), deprives the body of testosterone, the hormone that prostate tumors rely on for their growth. The MVI-816 vaccine is hoped to provide a means of reducing prostate cancer growth that avoids the need for castration. “Our goal in developing MVI-816 is to significantly delay both the onset of metastases and the initiation of castration for these patients,” explains president of Madison Vaccines, Richard Lesniewski. “This $8 million financing will allow us to advance our efforts to establish a safe and approvable immune activation therapy for men with early malignant prostate cancer.” The drug is a plasmid DNA vaccine comprising small pieces of modified bacterial DNA designed to induce the body’s immune system to mount an attack against prostate cells that display the prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antigen. “When the plasmid gets inside a professional antigen-presenting cell, it stimulates immune T cells that are responsible for killing tumor cells," explains McNeel. McNeel also highlighted the significance of developing the start-up’s second vaccine, MVI-118, which targets androgen receptors, molecules that are critical in the progression of prostate cancer and also in the resistance of many current ... Read more

Sectra Enters the US Medical Education Market…

SECTRA, USA, January 22, 2014 - The medical imaging IT company Sectra (STO: SECT B) has signed a partnership agreement with Touch of Life Technologies (ToLTech). Under the agreement, ToLTech will become a distributor of Sectra’s medical education solutions including the visualization table in the US and Canada. A new version of the Sectra Table will be presented publicly at the IMSH Congress in San Francisco, US on January 25-29. As part of the distribution agreement, ToLTech will integrate their VH Dissector™ anatomical education platform and models into the Sectra Visualization Table. Accordingly, users will be able to complement the Sectra educational cases, visualized on radiology images, with ToLTech’s 3D and cross-sectional visualizations. This will give the user access to an interactive dataset of over 2,000 segmented and annotated anatomical structures for medical education and reference. “The North American market has a large potential for our table. ToLTech has the experience and an extensive customer database in the medical education field and will not only will be the starting point of sales in that territory but will also help strengthen the product with a proven anatomical software”, says Karla Ramirez, Business Development Manager for the Sectra Visualization Table. About Sectra Visualization Table The Sectra Visualization Table is a large, multi-touch medical display with software that facilitates interaction with 3D images of the human body created by modern computer tomography or magnetic resonance cameras. Students are able to intuitively zoom in, rotate or cut into the visualized body without using a scalpel or destroying the subject. This means that the same image can be used repeatedly, and the students are able to study the impact of various illnesses on the anatomy in a manner that was not possible in teaching in the past. A unique function of the visualization table is that each university can download and create its own teaching files from its own clinical practices as well as using the preloaded collection of demonstration cases that comes with the table. The visualization table is powered by a tailored Sectra PACS workstation. Sectra’s patented visualization techniques also allow immediate display of datasets of extreme size, such as high-resolution, full-body scans. Sectra Visualization Table is used by universities and training hospitals in more than 15 countries throughout Europe, the Middle East and Southeast Asia. It has been developed in cooperation with Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Visualization Center C, The Interactive Institute and Linköping University, Sweden. About Sectra Sectra was founded in 1978 and has its roots in Linköping University in Sweden. The company’s business operation includes cutting-edge products and services within the niche segments of medical systems and secure communication systems. Sectra has offices in 12 countries and operates through partners worldwide. Sales in the 2012/2013 fiscal year totaled SEK 817 million. The Sectra share is quoted on the NASDAQ OMX Stockholm AB exchange. In the medical market, Sectra develops and sells IT systems and services for radiology and other image-intensive departments, orthopedics and rheumatology. More than 1,400 hospitals, clinics and imaging centers worldwide use the systems daily, together performing over 70 million radiology examinations annually. This makes Sectra one of the world-leading companies within systems for handling digital radiology images. In Scandinavia, Sectra is the market leader with more than 50% of all film-free installations. Sectra’s systems have been installed in North America, Scandinavia and most major countries in Europe and the Far East. About ToLTech Touch of Life Technologies is a medical education company that develops and sells interactive software and medical procedure simulators. ToLTech products provide a virtual learning environment combining state-of-the-art interactive technology with real anatomy from the National Library of Medicine’s Visible Human Project® as well as higher resolution ... Read more

Health IT Experts Brainstorm with ONC on Clinical …

January 21, 2014 - Informaticists joined clinical quality experts in a brain storming session this week with new ONC chief Karen DeSalvo, exchanging ideas on developing the "next generation" of quality measures. Charged with developing new e-clinical quality measures that can work in tandem with accountable care measures, the HIT Policy Committee’s Quality Measures Workgroup offered recommendations to Karen DeSalvo at her first policy meeting. The Workgroup’s co-chairs, National Quality Forum VP Helen Burstin, MD, and Veterans Health Administration informatics director Terry Cullen, MD, developed recommendations for measure domains, criteria and implementation, some of which seems to have drawn resistance from a few health IT companies. In the area of patient safety, the ONC and CMS should develop measures addressing falls, hospital-acquired infections and EHR safety, the Workgroup recommended. Providers could track their rates for avoidable readmissions, drug-drug interactions, falls and infections, all of which could help “proactively notify clinicians of high risk patients," Burstin and Cullen wrote. For population health and equity, new e-measures could include records tracking "pre-diabetic progressing to diabetes," along with other screenings such as mammograms and colonoscopies, and comparing the rates across patient demographics. To improve patient engagement, the workgroup is suggesting, the ONC and CMS could develop measurements for patient outcomes, experiences, self-management, preferences and shared-decision making. Burstin and Cullen are also suggesting developing measures that address "appropriateness of care and efficient use of facilities." Those e-measures could be based on clinical, claims and pharmacy data, and gauge the total cost of care based on a per member per month average, or the number of duplicate tests or the rate of avoidable emergency department visits. For all of those ideas and for all of e-clinical quality measures, Burstin and Cullen reiterated a principle that CMS leaders say they’re looking to adopt to reduce provider administrative burden: a "preference for reporting once across programs that aggregate data." Burstin and Cullen also recommended "innovation pathways" for implementing the measures. One "conservative approach" could use "certified development organizations" to "develop, release and report proprietary CQMs" for meaningful use. An alternative approach "might open the process to any (eligible provider or eligible hosptial) but constrain allowable eCQMs via measure design software." In either case, the HIT Policy Committee’s Tiger Team argues that a pathway with data validation would be costly to develop and maintain, and that it shouldn’t be considered as part the next meaningful use certification. And regardless of whether or not those proposed measures are included in certification, Burstin and Cullen noted that they have significant data and infrastructure needs: comprehensive claims data and interoperable systems across care ... Read more

New Horizons in Radiotherapy?
 …

January 20, 2014 - Targeted radiation therapy that is less harmful to healthy cells could see the light of day thanks to a team of French researchers from the Laboratoire de Chimie Physique - Matière et Rayonnement (CNRS/UPMC) working in collaboration with German and American scientists. Until now, radiotherapy treatments employed to combat cancer used a wide energy range when irradiating biological tissues. By studying at a fundamental level the behavior of molecules subjected to radiation with a carefully chosen energy, the researchers paved the way for tomorrow's radiotherapy treatments, which would not affect as much surrounding tissue and whose total radiation dose would be considerably reduced. This work, which sheds new light on the behavior of matter at the atomic scale and which could have important benefits in medicine, is published on the website of the journal Nature. The radiotherapy currently used in nearly half of cancer treatments irradiates biological tissue using a radiation with a wide energy spectrum in order to destroy the cancerous cells. The work of the international team headed by two CNRS researchers from the Laboratoire de Chimie Physique - Matière et Rayonnement (CNRS/UPMC) should make it possible to improve the precision and quality of treatment by more finely targeting the range of energy used. Their fundamental research originally aimed to study the behavior at the atomic scale of matter subjected to radiation, here an X-ray type of radiation, whose energy is selected with extreme precision. When an atom absorbs X-rays of a given energy, a process known as "interatomic Coulombic decay" takes place, leading to the emission of electrons by one of the atoms within a molecule. In their experiment, the researchers demonstrated that it is possible to produce a large amount of low energy electrons in the immediate environment of this target atom, giving rise toa phenomenon of resonance. In what way can these results be interesting for radiotherapy? In a living environment, these low energy electrons are capable of causing the breakage of a double strand of neighboring DNA. However, living cells, including cancerous cells, are usually capable of repairing the damage caused to a single strand of DNA, but not to the double strand. Using this process, it is therefore possible to envisage targeting cancerous cells to destroy them. Since the irradiation of biological tissue in radiotherapy takes place over a wide energy range, the advantage of using a finely chosen radiation so as to bring about a resonant emission of the electrons is twofold: X-rays penetrate deeply into the tissues but only specific atoms within chosen molecules, administered beforehand so as to target the cancerous cells, are thus excited and the healthy tissues further away are not affected by the irradiation. In addition, the resonant excitation is ten times more efficient than the non-resonant excitation produced by less specific irradiation. The overall radiation dose may thus be considerably reduced. These results have for the moment been obtained on small molecules made up of less than five atoms. The researchers now plan to test this process of producing electrons on more complex molecules containing several hundred or even several thousand atoms, such as the molecules that make up living cells. In the long term, the aim is to produce such electrons, toxic for DNA, within cancerous cells. To do so, the researchers are envisaging irradiating tissues with X-rays having the appropriate energy, after using a target atom to tag the cancerous ... Read more

MR and CT Systems Provide Excellent Image Quality at …

SIEMENS, UK, January 20, 2014 - The Western General Hospital, one of NHS Lothian’s main adult acute hospital sites, has recently installed two imaging systems from Siemens Healthcare. The MAGNETOM® Aera MR and SOMATOM® Definition AS CT system were selected for high image quality and speed, with staff remarking on the systems’ ease of use. The installation followed a robust procurement and evaluation process, replacing two existing Siemens systems. The MAGNETOM Aera will mainly be used for oncology as part of the hospital’s regional oncology center status. The system’s advanced scanning software can automate many clinical steps and maintain image quality plus assisting with workflow. The Aera features TimTM 4G (Total imaging matrix) and DotTM (Day optimizing throughput) technology integration for enhanced productivity, efficiency and high resolution imaging. DirectRFTM also helps to provide excellent RF signal purity and stability to deliver the best possible image quality. This is further boosted with 48 RF channels and lightweight coils. The SOMATOM Definition AS provides fast and accurate diagnosis and is currently being used for colonoscopy, guided biopsy and other interventional procedures. The 64 slice Definition AS replaces a previous generation 16 slice system, providing an excellent improvement in image quality. The system ensures the right dose is received by patients with the use of Combined Applications to Reduce Exposure (CARE). The use of Fully Assisting Scanner Technologies (FAST) enables clinicians to undertake time-consuming and complex procedures rapidly. “The image quality of the MAGNETOM Aera and SOMATOM Definition AS from Siemens Healthcare has received glowing feedback from the clinical team,” states Lorraine Hudson, Associate Sector Manager for Radiology, Western General Hospital, NHS Lothian. “The Definition AS joins another Siemens CT system based in the Neurology Department, which means familiarity of the user interface has been a benefit for our team.” “The recent upgrade of MR and CT technology at the Western General Hospital demonstrates NHS Lothian’s ongoing commitment to providing the technology that will deliver the best possible results for patients,” states James Weir, Regional Sales Manager at Siemens Healthcare. “Both systems offer high imaging standards to clinicians, along with a range of applications that ensure procedures run smoothly and rapidly, helping to boost patient comfort and departmental ... Read more

AAMA Announces Creation of Assessment-Based …

Program completion qualifies medical assistants to enter orders for the CMS EHR Incentive Programs Chicago, Ill. (MMD Newswire) January 17, 2014 - On January 1, 2014, the American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA) created an Assessment-Based ... Read more

Successful Go-Live for CareCentric Embedded in EMIS Web…

January 16, 2014 - Graphnet has successfully embedded its CareCentric electronic health record into EMIS Web. This means that GPs using the EMIS system can access health and social care records from across the care community for the patient they are seeing, directly from their consultation screens and without logging onto a new system. The system is now live in two GP practices and will be rolled out to several hundred more over the next 90 days. The first go-live is at the Vitality Partnership, a super-partnership which provides integrated primary and secondary care services to over 50,000 patients from six sites across Sandwell and West Birmingham CCG, under a project supported by Central Midlands CSU. This deployment allows GPs at the Vitality Partnership to call and view real-time patient data held by Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals at the touch of a button, within patient context, from their EMIS Web screens. The CareCentric health integration engine, embedded within EMIS Web, pulls the information and displays it into a single shared care record. Data available to the GPs includes all A&E, inpatient and outpatient activity, results and clinical correspondence. “The significance is that we now get fast and painless access to full clinical information on a patient, literally with a single click. This is an important part of the process of providing high quality integrated care to our patients”, a spokesman for the Vitality Partnership said. Swift and convenient access to the shared record encourages GPs to use the record as an integral part of a patient consultation and helps in the planning of on-going care. By providing more complete information and reducing the time spent casting around for information, CareCentric Embedded delivers important benefits in terms of the quality of care provided, patient safety and the efficiency of services. Embedding CareCentric into EMIS and other systems is also an important step in the introduction of multi-agency shared care support. Assessments, workflows and care pathways can be developed in CareCentric and then accessed and managed by clinicians across a health community. Audit data shows that clinicians are more than twice as likely to use a shared record when it is embedded into local ... Read more

Glenfield Hospital Enhances Cardiac Imaging …

SIEMENS, UK, January 16, 2014 - Glenfield Hospital, part of University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, has recently installed four advanced imaging systems from Siemens Healthcare into its dedicated Cross Sectional CT and MRI Unit. The new technology includes a SOMATOM® Definition Flash CT, a SOMATOM Definition AS+ CT and two MAGNETOM® Aera 1.5T MR systems. They join an existing MAGNETOM Skyra MR system and were chosen due to excellent image quality and ease of use. The systems were procured through Asteral, the Equipment-as-a-Service company, on behalf of the Trust. The SOMATOM systems will enable Glenfield Hospital to provide an increased capacity of cardiac CT imaging procedures to patients. The Definition Flash and AS+ are available for clinical examinations 24 hours a day and are already in regular use scanning up to 40 patients per day. In addition to cardiac procedures, the systems support general CT imaging, biopsies and drainage. The Definition Flash utilises Stellar Detectors featuring TrueSignal Technology, enabling the system to supply ultra-thin slices with high spatial resolution and minimal noise levels. The Flash also incorporates two X-ray tubes for Flash Spiral scanning, enabling whole body scanning in less than five seconds while delivering the right dose to the patient - that is the most appropriate dose for that specific patient with regard to the diagnostic image quality required. The Definition AS+ provides excellent image quality plus obtains rapid coverage with 128 slices per rotation. Combined with a temporal resolution of 150ms, images are free from movement artefacts and provide a high level of anatomical detail for enhanced diagnosis. The system features ‘Adaptive 4D Spiral’ capabilities, allowing clinicians to view whole organ coverage in 4D. Rapid examination times conducted at the lowest possible dose are also helping the hospital with pediatric imaging, plus bariatric or claustrophobic patients. Glenfield Hospital is also benefitting from two MAGNETOM Aera MR systems, also supporting cardiac procedures and forming part of the hospital’s specialist cardiac MR offering. “We are delighted with the SOMATOM Definition and MAGNETOM Aera systems from Siemens Healthcare, that serve to bolster our cardiac provision and deliver excellent image quality for clinicians,” states Dean Mawby, Superintendent Radiographer at Glenfield Hospital. “The team of 16 radiographers and 5 assistants within the unit have been very impressed with the applications support Siemens has provided and these systems are an addition to existing Siemens technology in the hospital. “We have received positive feedback demonstrating how the CT and MR systems are assisting with cardiac throughput at the hospital, and how patients are benefitting from greater comfort from features such as the wide bore,” states Sarah Sandhu, Regional Sales Manager at Siemens Healthcare. “The four new systems provide rapid imaging, without comprising image quality; Siemens is looking forward to continuing a strong relationship with the ... Read more

Royal Liverpool University Hospital Enhances Imaging …

SIEMENS, UK, January 15, 2014 - The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, part of The Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, has enhanced its imaging capabilities with the installation of the ACUSON X700TM ultrasound system from Siemens Healthcare. This is the first X700 to be installed in the UK featuring wireless PACS capabilities. The system was chosen specifically for its excellent imaging quality, wireless PACS connectivity and inter-department mobility - this has allowed the X700 to be used across many departments, including Intensive Care and High Dependency Units. The system is simply transferred to the patient’s side in time-critical situations with images and notes available to clinicians immediately after a procedure has taken place via the PACS wireless connectivity. The system was also chosen for its ability to perform specialist imaging, specifically vascular procedures. The X700 provides an array of applications, previously only available from Siemens’ premium ACUSON ‘S’ range of ultrasound systems. One of these is the Advanced SieClearTM spatial compounding, a technique that improves contrast resolution and border detection by allowing rapid acquisition of overlapping images from different view angles. Furthermore, the X700 includes the intelligent workflow solution TGOTM (Tissue Greyscale Optimisation), providing instantaneous one-button image optimization. Enhanced image acquisition has also helped to enhance patient throughput, pivotal to the various clinical departments using the system. “One of the primary reasons we chose the X700 was due to its wireless PACS connectivity, as it was essential that clinicians were able to access images and notes immediately after procedures, which was not possible before,” states Colin Griffin, Lead Sonographer/ Advanced Practitioner at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital. “We have many other Siemens systems in the imaging department, so our staff are already very familiar with functionality. In conjunction with the wireless PACS system, this helps to save a lot of time for staff who can now focus more of their time on patient care.” “We are thrilled the Royal Liverpool University Hospital has added enhanced mobility and excellent image quality to its ultrasound department with the X700,” states Richard Evans, Regional Sales Manager at Siemens Healthcare. “We look forward to continuing the great relationship we share with the hospital, and are proud to be able to offer excellent imaging quality combined with ease of use across multiple ... Read more

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