Conference Report

MENA Healthcare Infrastructure Finance & Investment Summit 2011…

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The GCC Healthcare Challenge 2050 will be the core theme at our 2nd flagship MENA Healthcare Summit scheduled for 10 & 11 October at the Riyadh Marriott Hotel. It follows the successful 1st event held in Cairo in 2010 with over 300 senior officials and private sector decision-makers from over 25 Countries attending. The main topics to be addressed this year include: Hospital best practices and new business partnerships Improved med tech development: Regulation and role of the policy-makers E-Health opportunities across the Region M-Health and telemedicine: Meeting the challenges Innovative and sustainable health care funding tools: PPP routes, private equity, project finance, co-investment Role of insurance in financing healthcare infrastructure expansion Training and recruitment at centre focus to meet hospital bed growth. We will also have case studies and examine how a consensus-driven healthcare infrastructure and regulatory environment will play to the strengths of all parties thereby positioning the sector as a more accessible opportunity. Governments providing a clear and appropriate space will allow investors to expand, consolidate and support this important growth sector within a responsive and intelligently constructed regulatory framework. It is increasingly crucial for both public and private sector stakeholders to lobby for alternate ways of financing the healthcare system so as to create a sustainable healthcare economy. Private sector can provide accessibility to Capital and expertise, support properly targeted and well-managed healthcare expansion programs, ensure success of the new PPP projects whilst ensure training, resolving HR shortfall issues and developing robust State of the Art Health IT systems. View the event program here View our proposed sponsorship packages here To Register Click Here Sponsorship and Corporate Packages We offer a 15% discount on any ‘Sponsorship and Corporate Packages’ for Health Imaging Hub newsletter readers. For registration please fill in the online registration form, quote MHI011, and send to register@euroconvention.com. We welcome sponsors (and speakers) on a first come first served basis as well as exhibitors. Kindly review our various sponsorship opportunities, or contact us to discuss further your proactive participation: Claudio (T: +44 207 381 9291 - @: cassuto@euroconvention.com) Vanessa (T: +32 2 626 9663 - @: vmeys@euroconvention.com) Martin (T: +421 257 272 855 - @: mremias@euroconvention.com) VisitorsGovernment and private sector healthcare decision-makers from across the MENA region, Europe, Russia/CIS, America and Far-East ExhibitorsCompanies from the healthcare infrastructure, insurance, e-health and m-health sectors as well as relevant media partners Should you wish to reserve your seats, registration can be made by filling in the online registration form for the event and sending it to ... Read more

Mobile Health Expo 2011
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Mobile Health Expo is the only event focusing on the convergence of mobile technology and healthcare across the entire mobile health ecosystem, including mhealth, telemedicine, wireless and connected health. Mobile Health Expo is designed to ... Read more

SIIM2011: The top trends in Imaging informatics…

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Defining the top ten trends in imaging informatics is somewhat objective and depends on the perspective. For example, what is a top issue for an institution such as Brigham and Women’s might be a non-issue today for a community hospital and never become an issue for an outpatient clinic. In any case, here is the view from Kathy Andriole from the Brigham and Women’s hospital in Boston, and my modification to this list. Dose matters, meaning that it has to be registered and managed. This issue is reported on in another write-up (See our detailed report on Dose Issues in Radiology), but I would not necessarily list this as the number one trend. As a matter of fact, in many countries, notably Germany, the registration has been a legal requirement for a while, and manufacturers have been accommodating these requirements. One might conclude that it is about time that the US also takes action. Meaningful Use, definitely a US requirement which is related to implementation of electronic Health Records in meaningful manner as a result of the HiTech act. Unfortunately, the requirements for the different stages as defined by the US government is very vague about the specific radiology impact, and the various speakers on this topic at the conference were not able to give much insight in my opinion either. Therefore, yes this is an issue as hospitals need to get their EHR's certified, however, the impact on imaging seems to be uncertain, not well defined, and in any case minimal. Business Analytics, an important tool as a result of data mining. I can agree with this aspect as there is a big pressure on improving quality, increasing efficiency and reducing reimbursements and this can only be done if there is quantitative data to manage the processes. Clouds, “with a change of images”, another buzz word that seems to be a requirement in every vendor’s marketing brochure, not realizing that it is just a new name for outsourcing your image storage to a virtual 3rd party, and something that has been implemented for many years successfully by many commercial vendors under different names such as ASP, or SSP. I would categorize this trend more as a new term rather than a new technology. Lexicon of workflow: This is identical to the business analytics trend, but stressing the fact that there needs to be definition of terms and metrics about what and how to measure. Take for example the exam turnaround time. Is this measured from when the patient arrives in the ER, from when the information is entered in the information system, from when the order is placed, when it is received, or when the patient is retrieved for performing the exam.  The same applies to the complete status, is it when the radiologist signs off, the report is received at a RIS, or when it is retrieved and available for a physician. This is only one metric, there are several others that are important. Image sharing: I don’t have an issue with this trend, as a matter of fact, I would rate this one in the top three as institutions are starting to get large amounts of image son CD’s and wrestling with the issues on how to connect imaging providers to accept images electronically both on a regular as well as ad-hoc basis. Quantitative imaging: No argument here as there is definitely an increase in dynamic imaging and an increase in the measurements, especially for cardiology. Mobile technologies, another trend that I would have listed in the top three as the first tablet PC was approved for image display not too long ago. As the majority of the physicians most likely have a smart phone or device by now, the distribution of alerts and clinical information will become ubiquitous. Personal Health Records: I agree with this as well, although these are still implemented only by a couple of large organizations such as the VA and Kaiser and large employers such as Walmart. I believe that it will still take a while before there is a critical mass and many consumers are able and willing to manage their own healthcare information, and more importantly, that physicians and institutions are able and willing to interface to the many PHR providers out there. Last but not, least Artificial intelligence, a trend which I also agree with. In particular the many new applications for Computer Assisted Diagnosis or CAD, which is common for digital mammography and increasingly popular for breast MRI as well. New applications are being announced and implemented that look at chest nodules in CT and CR and other semi-automated detection of pathologies are getting popular. There are a couple of trends which I would have listed, the most important being: Vendor neutral archiving: one of the least understood, poorest defined and over-rated new trends as each vendor seems to have a different opinion and definition. Talking with several users, it appears that there are still many implementation issues around the concept of a true neutral, enterprise-wide archive. See our detailed discussion and white paper on Vendor Neutral Archive. Structured reporting, especially  for Ultrasound. This might not necessarily be an obvious trend, but based on the number of inquiries and issues that come across my desk that are related to the integration of DICOM structured reports from the modalities to the PACS and reporting systems, this is definitely becoming a major trend. It appears that almost all new Ultrasounds are now shipped with this capability and therefore the implementation of this is starting to get critical mass. Cardiology integration. Cardiology has traditionally been implemented as an “island” with its own database and workstations, however, the back-end, i.e. archive is increasingly being integrated, and the front-end, i.e. cardiology and radiology information system (CIS and RIS) now is also shared. For example, it is not uncommon that a Ultrasound modality is used for a cardiology exam, managed by the CIS and also for radiology exams, requiring the reconciliation of different modality worklists. At the viewer, a physician also wants to be able to see the images and other information from both departments. Ology integration. Expanding beyond radiology and cardiology, there is a need for digital mammography to be integrated, ophthalmology, dentistry, speech pathology, and to relate pathology and radiology information In conclusion, there are many new trends in imaging informatics, some of them more or less applicable based on the specific environment and view of the beholder. It is important to track these trends and learn about the issues and implementation challenges in order to be properly prepared. Herman OosterwijkVP & CTO Health Imaging ... Read more

SIIM2011: Advanced visualization…

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The advanced visualization session of SIIM 2011 conference was facilitated by a distinguished faculty of several major US institutions and brought up a couple of issues that were addressed differently by the various hospitals, such as: The presence of a dedicated advanced visualization aka 3-D lab: Some institutions have a dedicated 3-D department, some of them don’t. This is a good example where specialization, if done right can be very effective and efficient, and can be proven to be cost effective. The same applies on whether to use dedicated 3-D technologists or have this post processing done by the CT technologists. Some radiologists actually prefer to do it themselves. Again, there does not seem to be a universal model for this. Workflow issues: Post processing can be done before or after a study is ready to be viewed and/or added to a radiologist worklist. In institutions where turn-around metrics is monitored, the images are often made available immediately, while the post-processed data is often available even after a report is generated. This can create issues where a PASC system closes out a study upon reporting, not allowing additional series of images to be added to the same study after the fact. Archiving of thin slices: Most of the speakers seem to agree that the thin slices should be archived so that future flow up studies can be processed with the raw thin data being available for comparison. However, this seems to be geared towards the use in academic institutions where there is not so much a concern for storage space, as in practice, many institutions seem to only keep the thin slices on a dedicated 3-D server for a limited time, while only archiving the thick slabs and reconstructed 3-D images. If the thin slices are to be archived, it seems to be practice to do this as additional series so that the first thing that a physician sees when opening a study are not the 1000’s of images used for the 3-D. The use of automated algorithms: Every vendor uses its own algorithms and representations. As a matter of fact, one hospital took the same dataset and ran it through each of the four different systems it is using and each of them created a different result in the form of presentation and information provided. This creates confusion and lack of consistency. The lack of standard datasets for QA. There is a need for standard datasets generated potentially by standard phantoms that can be used to perform simple QA to make sure that the software and application of performing correctly. Clear definition of accuracy: Some of the parameters define future treatment, for example a stenosis of 70% of an artery could determine the need for surgery. However, if the measurement indicated by the software is 69% with a deviation of +/- 5%, the decision could be either way. The same applies for a value of 71%. Adoption of 3-D: Interestingly enough, all of the panel participants told the audience that they used the 3-D more for physician and patient communication than to base their diagnosis on. Apparently, they seem to have enough information from the 2-D, which is very likely caused by the fact that they are just used to this, and than the 3-D takes additional time and effort mainly due to poor integration with the radiology workstations. In conclusion, there is no standard workflow, archiving policies of raw data, and a lack of metrics and QA standards with regard to the use of advanced visualization. There is a lot of opportunities for improvement, even although there was no disagreement that the added value for communicating results with physicians and patients has been a major advantage. In the future, one would like these applications to be modular, similar to the APs on a smart mobile device, fully integrated with a EMR, and the raw data to be archived not on dedicated servers but rather on a share vendor neutral archive. Herman OosterwijkVP & CTO Health Imaging ... Read more

SIIM 2011 Opening Session Report: Dose Issue Tops the …

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Kathy Andriole from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston kicked off the sessions at the annual SIIM conference in Washington DC with listing her views on top ten Imaging Informatics trends for this year of which the number one is radiation dose. Although, maybe not the number one in my opinion, but definitely in the top five would be the issues around the minimizing and recording of dose. This is due to the ever increasing dose, especially of CT procedures in order to obtain a better image quality, but mainly because of a couple of recent incidents where technologists grossly over-exposed hundreds of patients. This resulted in new guidelines and requirements issued by the FDA for the recording of the estimated dose. There are still many aspects to be worked out; including on how and where to register the dose, what the appropriate dose level would be for certain procedures, and how to provide decision support systems (DSS) of when and how to alert technologists and physicians of potential excessive dose. First of all, with regard to the recording of the dose, the number of systems that have implemented the dose recording using the New DICOM dose report mechanism is minimal, as this is very new and the number of new systems in comparison with the already installed ones is most likely less than 10%. Therefore, most recording systems rely on screen scraping of that information from image captures. This information is then recorded in the PACS, RIS or a dedicated application in a database that can be accessed to provide reports based on study type, referring physician, technologist, or several other parameters. Several aspects of the radiation dose management have not been worked out and/or defined, for example, it would be ideal if an ordering system would have access to this information to alert a physician that a patient for which a CT is ordered, already had several procedures over a certain time period. This could impact the decision of doing yet another procedure, this is especially important for pediatric imaging. A standard transaction for this information exchange is not defined (yet). Another potential area is the information about the average “expected dose”, based on good practice  guidelines and/or obtained from a database that was generated from previous similar procedures in an institution. It could be preferable to have the reference information at the modality, for example as part of the modality worklist. This would require an extension of the worklist and access by the worklist provider of this information using again a to-be-defined transaction Another area to be defined is how to exchange the dose information in an HL7 transaction. One vendor at the conference actually showed a solution by which this information has been encoded in a standard HL7 results message, which was extended by a so-called Z-segment using this particular information. Lastly, how to interface this information to a patient centric database, preferably the personal health record, is also not defined yet. In conclusion, it might be right to identify the dose issue as the number one issue. The good news is that vendors are finally taking notice and are implementing new technologies that adjust the dose based on the specific body part, thereby minimizing the amount of radiation. However, with regard to the registration and the exchange of dose related information, there are still many questions to be answered, and standards as well as guidelines to be developed. There is definitely a place for 3rd party vendors in this space, however, one might expect that there will be several iterations taking place over the next few years before this is a truly plug-and-play standard solution. Herman OosterwijkVP & CTO Health Imaging ... Read more

Iraq Health Expo and Conference 2011…

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The International Medical Equipment, Healthcare Industry and Services Exhibition , IRAQ HEALTH EXPO ,first and foremost exhibition of the region  will be held in the Governorate of Basra on 27-30 October 2011 where potential investors ... Read more

3rd Annual Mobile Healthcare Industry Summit 2011…

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The Mobile Healthcare Industry Summit Team is delighted to announce confirmed speakers for the 3rd annual Mobile Healthcare Industry Summit 2011, 20-21st September, Brussels: Inform your international wireless health strategy with 2 days of pure case studies and interactivity from 60 executive speakers including: Andrew Fenton, Chief Information Officer, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, UK George Crooks, COO, NHS24, Scotland Vincenzo Costiglilola, President, European Medical Association, European Association for Predictive Preventative and Personalised Medicine, Belgium Thierry Zylberberg, Exec VP Strategic Partnerships and General Manager Health Business, France Telecom, France Keith Nurcombe, Managing Director - O2 Health / Global Director, Telefonica, UK Bradley Merrill Thompson, Member of the Firm in the Health Care and Life Sciences Practice, EpsteinBeckerGreen, USA Marco Mohwinckel, Healthcare Innovation, Janssen, Pharmaceutical Company of Johnson and Johnson, UK Asa Nordgren, CEO, Great Connection, USA Fredrik Linden, SALAR, Project Coordinator, Smart Open Services for European Patients (epSOS), Sweden Emre Tav?anc?l, Health Products Manager, Turkcell, Turkey Unique to the Mobile Healthcare Industry Summit 2011: Bored of hearing rhetorical 'what if' scenarios at other mHealth events? We understand the need to move the health connectivity discussion into a commercial context, that's why the Mobile Healthcare Industry Summit is entirely case-study driven, with a focus on mature markets, and engagement across the wireless, health and fitness sectors in public and private associations and service providers. With a new access price of €599 for everyone, and many working groups and cross-pollinator sessions to ensure holistic eco-system networking, this event is designed to maximise your business networking and learning time and ROI. Co-located with an exclusive European mHealth Alliance (EUmHA) workshop At the heart of EU regulation and Governance, Brussels In collaboration with the Mobile Healthcare Industry Summit Ambassadors Board Focused entirely on active case studies and industry participation in mature markets with cross-pollinator sessions, and working groups Sample topics Include: Accessing Health Keynote: Ensuring Cost-Effective Access to Health Support Anytime, Anywhere  Productivity Keynote: The Role of Productivity, Cost-saving and Staff Efficiency in Health Care, Social Care and Wellness  Case Study: Developing Capacity into Existing Healthcare Systems Real Routes to Market: Identifying Sustainable Socio-Economic Payer Structures for Health  Impacts on Users: Identifying Impacts of New Mobile Healthcare Applications on Users Creating Sustainable Public Policy for Wireless Healthcare Support Services and Products Trends in Mature Market Healthcare: Case Studies From The New Breed of Health Support  Eco-System Cross-Pollinator Session Devices panel discussion: tracking the evolution of medical and consumer targeted devices How do you register? Registration is open and we already have several bookings; make the most of our early bird rate. To book a delegate place click here The Mobile Healthcare Industry Summit ... Read more

GSMA-mHA Mobile Health Summit 2011…

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GSMA-mHA Mobile Health Summit 2011Cape Town, South Africa6-9 June 2011 The incredible advancement of mobile communications has created an opportunity to revolutionise the healthcare industry. From tools that promote healthy lifestyles to remotely monitoring disease outbreaks, the future of worldwide health clearly lies in mobile technology. Brought to you by leaders in the global health and mobile industries, the inaugural GSMA-mHA Mobile Health Summit will bring together senior executives from both ecosystems. The event™s conference, exhibition and networking will encourage the collaboration and relationships needed to realize the potential of mobile health. Join us in Cape Town for this future-setting event as we enable the Heart of Mobile Health. Visit ... Read more

Global E-Health Forum
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Global E-Health Forum – Hamburg 2011 will take place on October 11-13 Designing Personalized Healthcare: Hamburg, March 7, 2011: Improving the quality of healthcare, increasing the efficiency of the systems and ensuring patient empowerment - these are the common goals worldwide when discussing the necessary transformation of the systems in order to guarantee a sustainable healthcare delivery in the future. TheGlobal E-Health Forum – Hamburg 2011 will represent all the major stakeholders involved in designing personalized healthcare. “E-Health is increasingly seen as a key enabler for this transformation”, so Ljubisav Matejevic, founder and director of the Global E-Health Forum. “And as a key enabler for the evolution process towards personalized healthcare in general. Healthcare that is proactive, instead of reactive, gives the patient the opportunity and the responsibility to become more involved in their own health. The ultimate goal will be to shape preventive and diagnostic care to match each person’s unique characteristics.” The first two conference days will feature speakers from all over the globe. Their strategy presentations and case studies will be complemented by discussion forums, workshops and an exhibition of solution providers. The third day is dedicated to various breakout sessions and guided tours at different locations (among others hospitals) targeting the individual information needs of special interest groups. The Global E-Health Forum is an interdisciplinary platform to discuss strategies, cross-border cooperation and collaboration, innovative economic/financing models. “We need to learn from best practices regarding quality and knowledge management, standardization, process optimization. And we need to implement a patient-centric way of thinking.” concludes Ljubisav Matejevic. “Our challenge is to design personalized healthcare.” For further information and registration, please see www.global-ehealth-forum.com For further information, please contact: Global E-Health Forum – Hamburg 2011 c/o Common Sense – Gesellschaft für Marketing + Kommunikation mbH Hofweg 8, 22085 Hamburg, Germany Telefon: + 49 - 40 - 43 21 35 53 E-Mail: gehf@common-sense.biz President of Canada Health Infoway to Deliver Keynote at GEHF ... Read more

Africa Health 2011
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Africa Health is a major three-day Exhibition and Congress that will take place 9-11 May 2011 in South Africa as an integral part of IIR and Informa's successful exhibition and conference portfolio, and as an extension of IIR Middle East's leading ... Read more

IPR London 2011
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The International Paediatric Radiology Congress, which is held every tenth year in Europe, is coming to London from the 27th 31st May 2011, at the Metropole Hilton Hotel. This event is being organized by the joint societies of Paediatric Radiology, the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) and the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR) and supported by the Asian Oceanic Society for Paediatric Radiology (AOSPR) and Sociedad Latino Americana de Radiología Pediátrica (SLARP). There is an exciting and extensive program on offer which includes; a wide selection of world renowned speakers, debates, competitions, a selection of six different sunrise sessions each morning, 200 posters, and a series of state of the art mini-symposia. The social programme makes the most of London's legendary and unique artistic, historic and architectural heritage. Full information is available online at: ... Read more

Intel Joins The European mHealth Alliance.…

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The Mobile Healthcare Industry Summit congratulates news from The European mHealth Alliance (EuMHA), who on Friday announced Intel as a foundation member. Intel have agreed to Chair the Innovation Workstream of EuMHA and will join the International Leadership Panel, which advises the Board of EuMHA on Strategy. David McCarron, EMEA Healthcare Manager of Intel said "We are delighted to be part of EuMHA which is providing leadership in Europe in what is a fast growing but new and fragmented sector. Today, the healthcare industry worldwide is far from healthy. Mobile health solutions should help to give better access to care at acceptable costs and improve quality and security. We believe the opportunity to work with the membership mix of EuMHA which includes Healthcare Providers, Research Institutes and companies, large and small will deliver much needed focus.” Following a week of announcements at the mHealth Summit in Washington, this news suggests a similar element of opportunity and collaboration among the EU stakeholders in mHealth. Most noticeably EuMHA membership seems to nod towards multi-disciplinary and cross-Atlantic best practice sharing – something essential in order to avoid ‘re-invinting the wheel’ in regulation negotiation, design, user-uptake and interoperability issues within mobile healthcare adoption and development. 2011 looks set to be an exciting year for EuMHA and mHealth generally. Watch this space! Intel will be among the delegate audience at the Mobile Healthcare Industry Review on the afternoon/evening of the 14th December – join us for some informed sessions and roundtables before two hours of networking drinks with the most involved in mobile healthcare service and product development. Register here, for ... Read more

Medhealth Beirut 2011, what is expected?…

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Arab Hospital Federation (AHF) represents one of the highly prestigious healthcare organizations in the Middle East, as it includes a wide range of Arab countries represented by high-profiled officials. AHF conducted 8 previous conferences, moving between several Arab cities. The latest version was Medhealth 2010 meeting in Cairo. Medhealth Beirut 2011, a new prospect for a new decade. The next AHF conference (Medhealth 2011) will take place in the beautiful city of Beirut in Lebanon. 2011’s AHF Annual meeting will be conducted under the high patronage of H.E. General Michel Sleiman, The President of the Lebanese republic. The event takes place while various Arab countries have decided to draw more attention to their healthcare and medical sectors, which appear when we check the increasing budgets Arab countries are directing towards these sectors. Medhealth Beirut 2011 will be attended by a number of highly-ranked Arab healthcare officials, such as health ministers, directors, and officials from the Arab League. The attendees will gather at the Arab Hospital Federation Annual Forum to discuss the latest in the Arab healthcare and medical sectors. Medhealth Beirut 2011 program highlights. Various interesting topics will be discussed during Medhealth Beirut 2011; such topics include reviewing the latest emerging healthcare trends, Managing Health Tourism: from Local to Global, Greening and Sustainability in Healthcare, in addition to Managing Quality care in the next decade. Moreover, the Arab Hospital Federation Annual Forum will allow its attendees a genuine chance to meet and network with a group of top-leveled healthcare and IT experts from Western countries, interactive discussions will take place between presenters and attendees to ensure maximum benefits. Arab Hospital Federation Annual Forum, what about Exhibitors? Arab Hospital Federation Annual Forum offers an excellent chance to exhibitors, at the Medhealth 2011 Congress, to showcase their latest innovative products and services, interact with their current clients, and to gain new customers. A wide range of companies are welcomed to contribute to Medhealth 2011 Congress, such as Hospitals & specialized Medical Centers, in addition to medical equipment, pharmaceutical, ICT, and health insurance companies. For registration and more information, please visit ... Read more

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